Blue CollarFrom 2000-2006, the Blue Collar Comedy Tour travelled across America as one of the most successful comedy acts of their day. One of their comedians, Jeff Foxworthy, was famous for his “You might be a redneck if …” jokes.

How do we take a theology lesson from him? We realize that the book of Galatians is dedicated to refuting legalism – the idea that your performance can make you more acceptable to God. Most Christians would agree that their performance doesn’t make God love them more. Yet, despite agreement in word, our actions often tell a different story.

So, in light of Jeff Foxworthy and the Blue Collar Comedy Tour, ask yourself these 4 questions and see if you actually believe your performance can make you more acceptable to God. You might be a legalist if …

  1. What’s your motivation for obeying God? Is it fear that God will be mad at you? If so, you are believing a false gospel that your performance matters.
  2. Do you obey God in hope that he will bless you? If so, you are believing a false gospel that have not received the richest blessing possible and that your performance can gain a greater blessing.
  3. When circumstances in your life go wrong, do you get angry at God or yourself because good people basically deserve a comfortable life? Do you say, “God, how could you do this to me, after all the time and money I gave to the church? If so, you are believing a false gospel that your performance matters.
  4. Does your self-view swing between 2 poles? When you are living up to your standards, do you feel confident and good about yourself but then feel like a worthless failure when you screw up? If so, you are believing a false gospel that your performance matters.[1]

If you are a Christian, God sees Christ’s righteousness on your account, not your sin (or your righteousness). Stop trying to earn His favor. He loves you infinitely and your performance cannot impact that!

Question: In what ways are you prone to try to earn God’s favor?

 

[1] Adapted from Timothy Keller, Center Church: Doing Balanced, Gospel-Centered Ministry In Your Church (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2012), 65.

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