NarniaSometimes it feels like life hits you in the face with a frying pan. It’s like in the kids’ movie Tangled. The Rapunzel character uses a cast iron skillet to wallop whomever she feels is a threat. Ouch. Sometimes that explosion of pain from being cold-cocked with the skillet is because something has gone terribly wrong in your personal life; other times that skillet just whacked a friend. And you hurt because they hurt so badly.

I’ve not really struggled with asking why in my life. I know God is able. I know God’s plan will prevail. Yes, I know Jesus loves me. How do I know? For the Bible tells me so. We can argue the reasons the Bible is actually reliable another day…

But life still hurts. Some days a lot.

To be honest, the sovereignty of God is something I am growing to understand more deeply of late. Motherhood has demanded it as I consider the supreme power and right of God when it comes to trusting Him with my kids. From there it just overflows into the rest of life.

I will get that new job if…

The house will sell if…

If I have another child…

If I had a little more cash…

If God cared about…

I’ll do that if…

If my baby…

If I lose my job…

If I never have another baby…

If that injustice occurs…

What if?

So the question becomes:  do I trust the God who loves me and gave Himself for me with that one little word – if? It’s not such a little word, is it? In the word “if” we hear the uncertainty. The lack of control we really have on this life. In what “if” we are faced with the fact that there is something bigger than us out there. If there weren’t, then we’d never have to question. There would be nothing beyond my intention.

Frankly, that’s an unsettling thought. There is something in control that is bigger than I am. But, since I am confident that that something is actually a Someone who is good, I can rest assured. I can trust Him with that “if.”

All through Scripture, we see that the Lord is good. Even in deep waters, the Psalmists are faithful to portray God’s character as good. If God were less than good, it wouldn’t be so comforting to trust Him. And even as we trust Him, we understand that life will not be daisies and roses all of the time.

Jesus said quite the opposite. He said to not be surprised when the world hates us. He said, “Follow me,” and He was a gypsy teacher with no home to lay his head. He never said things would go well. He just promised He would always be with us – no matter what.

Mr. Beaver, in The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe, makes a profound statement about Aslan, the Christ figure, in the story “Who said anything about safe? ‘Course he isn’t safe. But he’s good. He’s the King, I tell you.”

Eloquently, Mr. Beaver shows us that in talking about this King, there is a distinction between safe and good.

The road may be filled with aches, hurts, and uncertainty, but the King is still good.

The “if” is scary all by myself. But, Jesus, like Aslan, is good. Even when life doesn’t feel safe.

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